Friday, August 29, 2014

A one act play in three song titles.

lastowka:

I challenge anyone to submit a better “Song Title Play”!

[Ext. Street corner.]

Steve: 

Gary: 

Steve: 

[End Scene]

Act 1:
[Int. An Expensive Restaurant]

Susan:


Bill:



[End Scene]

re-cut-off:

Frankenstein Meets The Space Monster (1965) Robert Gaffney

re-cut-off:

Frankenstein Meets The Space Monster (1965) Robert Gaffney

oldschoolfrp:

Dice.  (AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1979.)

oldschoolfrp:

Dice.  (AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1979.)

thesylverlining:

ALMOST. JUST A LITTLE MORE.

(Source: pythonprincen)

1) If you critiqued the sexist content in a game many will try to persuade you that this means that the rest of your critique is meaningless and they will try to persuade you to kill yourself.

2) If you critiqued a fan favourite and did not enjoy the game, commenters will try to persuade you to kill yourself.

3) If you critiqued a game and you previously critiqued a fan favourite unfavourably the fans of the previous game will appear to tell you your critique is meaningless and will try to persuade you to kill yourself.

4) If you critiqued something that is not a fan favourite and really enjoyed the game, commenters will accuse you of being paid off for your opinion and will try to persuade you to kill yourself.

5) If you are a woman and you have written about topics in the game pertaining particularly to matters concerning your gender’s outlook or socialisation commenters will try to persuade you to kill yourself.

6) If you wrote a piece of New Games Journalism, describing your playthrough as more of a travelogue or personal journey as analysis of the game, commenters will type ‘BUT IS IT ANY GOOD THOUGH’ or ‘BUT WHAT ABOUT THE ACTUAL GAME’ and then try to persuade you to kill yourself.

Happily, commenters are usually not very good writers, and so largely are very unpersuasive in getting you to kill yourself.
Cara writing about games journalism and freelance life is smart and wise in many ways, but i’m totally linking to the listicle bit of it. Read the rest here. (via kierongillen)

unexplained-events:

The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death

Frances Glessner Lee, a millionaire heiress, revolutionized the study of forensics and crime scene investigation. She believed that crimes could be solved by a detailed analysis of visual and material evidence.

She used newspaper reports, and interviews with policemen and morgue workers to create miniture crime scenes(which were extremely detailed) such as suicides, accidental deaths, accidents as homicides and homicide, potentially, as suicides. Of the twenty she made, eighteen have survived and of those eighteen, eleven show violent deaths of women. Everything from the wallpaper to the presence of alcohol and drugs was added to the miniture crime scenes.

This helped investigators train to identify crimes and clues found at crime scenes and left a big mark on the field as we know it today. They were also used in Harvard Associates in Police Science (HAPS) seminars. She called them nutshell cases, a name that was inspired by a detective who told her this:

As the investigator, you must bear in mind that there is a two-fold responsibility—to clear the innocent as well as expose the guilty. Seek only the facts—Find the truth in a Nutshell.

SOURCE

Thursday, August 28, 2014
phoning-it-in:

ff-365:

Fantastic Four #89 by Stan Lee & Jack Kirby
Since today would have been Jack Kirby’s 95th birthday, I’d like to ask you all to think about making a donation to the Hero Initiative in his honor. If you’ve enjoyed this blog, or The King’s work in general, please help give back to the men and women who’ve given us so much entertainment like him. 

Post form one year ago, still what you should do today. 

phoning-it-in:

ff-365:

Fantastic Four #89 by Stan Lee & Jack Kirby

Since today would have been Jack Kirby’s 95th birthday, I’d like to ask you all to think about making a donation to the Hero Initiative in his honor. If you’ve enjoyed this blog, or The King’s work in general, please help give back to the men and women who’ve given us so much entertainment like him. 

Post form one year ago, still what you should do today. 

comicbookcovers:

Devil Dinosaur #2, May 1978, cover by Jack Kirby

comicbookcovers:

Devil Dinosaur #2, May 1978, cover by Jack Kirby

Another time, Jack took a call. A voice on the other end said, ‘There are three of us down here in the lobby. We want to see the guy who does this disgusting comic book and show him what real Nazis would do to his Captain America’. To the horror of others in the office, Kirby rolled up his sleeves and headed downstairs. The callers, however, were gone by the time he arrived.

Mark Evanier, Kirby: King of Comics (via dawgriguez)

They only brought three?

(via twentypercentcooler)

(Source: nerdhapley)